July in the books

July came and went and when all was said and done I read 17 books. The books ranged from romance, historical fiction, and thrillers to classics, nonfiction, and even a debut graphic memoir.

Here’s a look at what I read:

53) Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston — 4/5 stars

I picked this book up last summer and got about 70 pages into it but then lost track and didn’t finish it. I started rereading it this summer and finished it in three days. It’s a super fun book and a little look into what could have been in the 2016 election.

54) Take a Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert — 4/5 stars

Hibbert has a talent for writing a romance with characters who seem real. Zaf struggles with anxiety and grief. Dani struggles with dropping walls and letting people get close to her. I enjoyed this book.

55) The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas — 5/5 stars

I read this for book club. We wanted to read a different kind of book and decided to tackle this classic. I really enjoyed the prison years, Edmond learning there, his growth, and seeing how the story unfolded in the coming years. I got chills at the end- all human wisdom is summed up in these two words: wait and hope.

56) A Burning by Megha Majumdar — 3.5/5 stars

This book was a quick read. I enjoyed the short chapters and changing perspectives. I didn’t enjoy the ending but it didn’t take away from the book overall.

57) Dancing at the Pity Party by Tyler Feder — 5/5 stars

I read this book in one sitting and I wasn’t prepared for it’s beauty. It’s a graphic novel and the illustrations are perfect. It made me laugh and cry and feel feelings. It covers grief, losing a parent, and learning to cope.
“I’m still here, trying to turn the crap into something sweet. Just like she would.”

58) Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia — 4/5 stars

This gothic was nightmarish, dreamy, and creepy. It has a mix of creepy dreams, potent mushrooms, and a really creepy family with a terrible history. I enjoyed the book and finished it in about two days.

59) The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett — 4/5 stars

I really enjoyed the vanishing half. I listened to the audio version and at times it was hard to keep up with the changing perspectives, but overall I really liked it. I think I would have liked more story lines with Desiree and Stella vs. Kennedy and Jude.

60) Turtles all the Way Down by John Green — 4/5 stars

John Green can really do no wrong. The main character suffers from anxiety and OCD and the dialogue is a realistic look of what she goes through every day. She has a loveable best friend who doesn’t always handle it the best and a loving mother who cares so much about her but doesn’t know how to be there for her and stop trying to “fix” her. The book also has the backdrop of a ridiculous story of a billionaire evading arrest and the main character and her friend decide to try to find out what happened to win the reward money. It’s also fun to read a book about Indianapolis when I live in Indianapolis. Moral of the story is this book is an unflinching look at anxiety but it’s also a lot of fun and a little bit of an adventure.

61) Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan — 4/5 stars

This series is wacky, outrageous, and consistently fun. The third and final book didn’t disappoint. It was satisfying to see Nick reconnect with his family.

62) The Good Luck Girls by Charlotte Nicole Davis — 4/5 stars

I read this book on the recommendation of my local library. They give out recommendations each week and all you do is tell them a book you recently loved and they’ll find something similar that’s available in Libby as an e-book or audiobook. This book has similar themes to grace year, handmaids tale, and a western. I really enjoyed the friendship and the growth of the characters. There’s no love triangle in this book, which I loved. My only complaint is that the author paints a whole new world in this book and I wanted more background on the raveners, vengeants, welcome houses, and arketta. I believe there will be a sequel so maybe more details will come in that.

63) Big Summer by Jennifer Weiner — 3/5 stars

I was expecting a beach read but it definitely was not that. It’s a bit of a mystery/thriller. There are a lot of twists including fat shaming, frenemies, and social commentary about social media and women’s bodies. I did not enjoy the flashbacks in the first part of the book. There wasn’t any indication that the scene switched to a past memory which made it hard to follow. But, I enjoyed seeing Daphne’s character growth, I loved her relationship with her parents, and how Nick, Darshi, and Daphne worked together.

64) Rabbit by Patricia Williams — 5/5 stars

This book was both hard to read at times but also a quick read. I found myself outraged at Ms. Pat’s upbringing and how she was treated by her mother and “family friend”. It was also laugh out loud funny. She overcame a lot and has turned her pain into laughter and growth.

65) I’m Still Here by Austin Channing Brown — 5/5 stars

The book was short but impactful. She details some of the discrimination she has faced throughout her life and forced the reader to consider their own unchecked biases.

66) The Guest List by Lucy Foley — 4/5 stars

Very entertaining. I thought I had it all figured out half way through and then I dramatically gasped out loud in the last 20-30 pages.

67) Life Without Water by Marci Bolden — 4/5 stars

I read this book in two days and it was very emotional. I enjoyed that it was also full of adventure, whimsy, forgiveness, and redemption on the way to facing past demons.

68) The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander — 5/5 stars

The author details the deep roots of racism and prejudices in this country and its prison system. At times hard to read, it’s very important to recognize the problems in this system and not turn away from them.

69) Summer of ‘69 by Elin Hilderbrand — 4/5 stars

It took me a little bit to get into this book and all of the characters but I ended up really enjoying it. I was rooting for the characters and enjoying the arc of the story.

What did you read in July?

My very own summer reading program

One of my favorite childhood memories is participating in my library’s summer reading program. Basically the more books you read, the more points you earn and you can exchange your points for prizes.

I decided this summer I would do my own summer reading program, if you will. No, there aren’t points or prizes. I’ve just been checking out books from the library and reading as much as I can.

Here are some of my favorite books I’ve read.

1). Beartown – Fredrik Backman

I started Beartown in the spring and read a few chapters before I put it down. The chapters were short but there were so many characters it was hard to keep them straight. I decided to pick it up again in June and I’m glad I did. It’s a slow burn, but the character development and story is so good. Beartown is a book about a hockey town, but it’s not a hockey book.

2). Us Against You – Fredrik Backman

I loved Beartown so much I had to read the sequel. Sometimes sequels get a bad rap, but I didn’t find that to be true with Us Against You. The book broke my heart into a million pieces, but in the best way. I fell in love with the characters and hurt when they hurt and cheered on their successes.

3). Miracle Creek – Angie Kim

Miracle Creek was more than just a thriller or courtroom drama. I thought the author did a great job of conveying deep, complex, and messy people. The book tackles family ties and facing the consequences of your actions. It also kept me guessing until the end.

4). The Lost Girls of Paris – Pam Jenoff

The Lost Girls of Paris started a little slow, but after awhile I couldn’t put it down. It’s a historical fiction novel about women working with the SOE as spies during World War II. It was nerve-wracking and pulled on my heartstrings at the same time. I can’t say I loved everything about it, but it did a great job of showing how fierce and resilient women are.

5). The Wedding Date – Jasmine Guillory

After diving into some historical fiction novels and thrillers, I needed a break. The Wedding Date was just what I needed. It was a quick read and it was charming. I loved reading about Alexa and Drew. I also read The Proposal – the second book in the series. The third book, The Wedding Party is up next for me.

Just like everyone, I have also read books that I wish I could unread.

The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna by Juliet Grames was that book for me. I thought it was unnecessarily long and unnecessarily depressing. It has a lot of good reviews on Goodreads, but it was not the book for me. I will say the beginning was intriguing and had a lot of promise and I liked reading about the Italian-American immigrant family. But, I found it so grim and depressing that I wouldn’t recommend reading it.

What about you? What are you reading? What did you like and what ended up on your did not finish list?